Chicken Fingers with Maple Dijon Brussel Slaw

0
256
Paleo Chicken Fingers With Maple Dijon Brussels Slaw Tonight called for a hearty salad, so I whipped one up. I did nine 500m intervals on the rower, so I was hungry!
Here’s how it went…
I trimmed the stems from two pounds of Brussels sprouts and rinsed them well.
I set up the slicer blade on my food processor and blitzed the sprouts.
I peeled three carrots, sliced them in half lengthwise and ran them through the slicer as well. Then, I chopped 4 slices of bacon and added them to a large mixing bowl.
I pulled out my blender and added 4 TBSP rice wine vinegar, 2 TBSP Dijon mustard, 2 TBSP maple syrup, 4 dashes of Valentina hot sauce, and a pinch of kosher salt. I turned the blender on and drizzled 6 TBSP of olive oil through the hole in the top of the blender.
I had Jessie pour the dressing into the bowl while I took a picture.
I mixed the slaw, added another pinch of kosher salt and placed the bowl in the fridge.
I sliced one pound of boneless skinless chicken breast into thin strips and added an egg to a small bowl.
I whisked the egg, added the chicken to it and brought in a small bowl of almond meal to which I added a pinch of kosher salt and ground black pepper.
I heated a large skillet with 1/3″ olive oil to 402 degrees F. I usually start frying at 380 or so, but this got away from me a little. I simply added a few more chicken fingers than normal straight away to cool the oil to right around 350 degrees.
I crisped up the chicken on both sides and then transferred it to a bakers rack placed over a sheet pan. It took three batches to fry all of the chicken. I lightly salted the chicken as I removed it from the pan.
Time to plate!
I placed some slaw in the center of a plate and topped it with 3 chicken fingers
This was a hearty meal that tasted better than I thought it would.
Here’s one more look. This would be good with some dried fruit added to it and a squeeze of fresh lemon over the chicken would work wonders as well. I gobbled it up and did not complain. The above recipe made enough for 4-5 hungry adults.

Give this one a try. The chicken frying is a bit involved but totally worth it. I now have 2 quarts of slaw and a tray of chicken fingers for breakfast and lunch tomorrow. Remember, if you’re going to “go Paleo” then you’d better learn to cook! You don’t have to listen to me but you should 😉

“Keep It Paleo!”

(In charge of these two respectable young gentlemen…)

Chicken Fingers with Brussel Slaw

Ingredients for the Slaw:

  • 2 pounds brussel sprouts, stems trimmed, rinsed well
  • 3 carrots, peeled, sliced in half lengthwise
  • 4 slices bacon, cooked and chopped
  • 4 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 4 dashed of hot sauce
  • Kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil

Ingredients for the Chicken Fingers:

  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into thin str
  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups almond flour
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • Olive oil, as needed

Preparation Instructions:

  1. Set up a food processor with the slicing blade. Use this to slice the brussel sprouts. Pour them into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Do the same with the carrots and add to the mixing bowl. (If you don’t have a food processor, a shredder will also work to achieve this)
  3. Add bacon to the mixing bowl.
  4. Place the rice wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, maple syrup, hot sauce and kosher salt into a blender. Turn on the blender and drizzle the olive oil into the mixture slowly until smooth and creamy.
  5. Pour dressing into the mixing bowl and toss. Add another pinch of kosher salt and set in the refrigerator until it is time to plate.
  6. Olive oil, as needed
  7. Place egg into a small mixing bowl and beat. Add chicken strips into this bowl and stir to coat.
  8. In another small mixing bowl, place almond flour and kosher salt and pepper.
  9. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add ¼” olive oil. Once the oil is good and hot (about 380°F), slowly add the chicken strips into the pan. Be sure to not crowd the pan. This will cool the oil too much and make for soggy fingers. Nick fried his fingers in 3 batches.
  10. Place each batch onto a baker’s rack over a sheet pan and lightly salt while hot.
  11. Once all your chicken is fried, place a heaping helping of slaw onto a plate and top with 3 chicken fingers. This will make about 4-5 serving. Enjoy!

“Keep It Paleo!”

Zone Breakdown For Slaw:

Protein: (3)

We have 4 slices of bacon in the slaw. 3 slices equal one block, so for easy math we will just say that this is one block of protein.

Carbohydrates: (9)

We have 2 pounds of Brussel sprouts. About .2 of a pound equals one cup, therefore we have about 10 cups of brussel sprouts. 1.5 cups equal one block, so we are going to say we get 6 blocks from the burrsel sprouts. Additionally we are using three carrots, with one carrot equaling one block giving us 3 more blocks. And finally we get 3 blocks from the maple syrup. Two teaspoons equal one block, so with 3 teaspoons being in 1 tablespoon, we get 3 blocks.

Fats: (54)

We have 6 tablespoons of olive oil for the slaw. We know that there are 9 blocks in 1 tablespoon, so therefore we get 54 blocks of fat.

Zone Breakdown For Chicken Fingers:

Protein: (13)

We have 16oz of chicken that we are going to cook. Once cooked it will cook down to about 13oz. with 1oz equaling one block, that gives us 13 protein blocks from the chicken. Additionally we get one more protein block from the egg.

Fats: (37)

Our fats are coming from the almond flour. We start with 2 cups Almond Flour. We know that 6g of Almond flour equals one block. One cup weighs about 112g, so therefore we are using 224g, giving us 37 blocks.

Balancing Act:

Between both the slaw and the chicken fingers, we have a total of 15 protien blocks. We have 12 carb blocks, and 91 fat blocks. We are a little heavy on the fats, but not all of it will be consumed. Divide the slaw and chicken into 4 portions, giving you just over 4 protein blocks and 3 carb blocks per serving.

Leave a Reply